FRIDAY HACKS: Summertime foot pain? We have some TOE-tally good tips!

(audible groans at Rachel's terrible pun title. I regret nothing!)

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So it seems that Melbourne has finally kicked into the summer weather this week in, March?? Better late than never we say. Unfortunately, this is also the time that Osteopaths tend to see a rise in people coming in with foot and lower limb pain. Think about the footwear you have been seen in over the last few months. Questionable? Bare feet? Living in your thongs? Prolonged walking and time in unsupportive footwear can lead to not only sore feet, but problems in your knees, hips and low back.

Here are a few tips to think about when summer time foot pain sets in:

Get some ankle support - Without a strap or support around your ankle, walking and running puts extra strain on the toes to grip onto the shoe and give you stability. We recommend trading out the thongs for a sandal with a strap if possible, or at least limit the time you are in the pluggers. Convenient? Yes. Helpful for your pain? Not so much.

Stretch out those calves - No matter what shoes you are in, they tend to be less supportive than the comfy runners and boots we can get away with in winter. Try and counteract this by making sure you stretch your calves and hamstrings whenever you get the chance. Take a look at the calf stretch and stretches with a foam roller here.

Foot pain first thing in th e morning? Get yourself a golf ball - A great easy stretch is to get a golf ball and use it to massage the bottom of your foot. Try this when you are sitting at home in the evening, or even keep one in your drawer for any easy stretch to do while at the desk. PRO TIP: Pop that sucker in the freezer for ten minutes to ice and massage your foot at the same time!

Of course, if your pain has progressed and is not alleviated by easy at home measures, it might be time for a end of summer tune-up at the Osteopath. Give us a call or head to the bookings page to make a time with one of us now!

 

- Rachel

 

Friday Osteo Life Hacks (feat. Towels?!)

A towel, it is said, is about the most massively useful thing an interstellar hitchhiker can have.

Before you try and say, 'But Rachel, I am not an interstellar hitchhiker or even a big nerd like yourself', hold up. A towel is still probably the most useful DIY tool that anyone can have, when it comes to good posture and helping out that niggling shoulder tension.

Let me explain.

When you do repetitive tasks with your hands in front of you (eg. computer work, driving, sick guitar solos) you tend to disrupt the balance between the muscles at the front of your body and the back. Over time, this drag to the front can start to cause pain and headaches as the body tries to compensate for the position it is in, particularly in the upper back and neck regions. Some call this 'desk disease', but really it applies to any job or task that pulls you forwards.

'HELP. THIS IS ME!' I hear you cry. I hear you. It is me too.

The answer to this kind of pattern is very logical. If you are being pulled forwards, we need to reset the balance and bring you back to your body's equilibrium. We need to stretch out the front and add some strength to the back. You should head along to your favourite local Osteopath (hi!) and get some help with movement, pain relief and strengthening exercises soon.

In the meantime, grab that towel!

Fold it in half, and then half again. Roll it up so it is now a firm cyclinder shape.

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Place it in between your shoulder blades vertically, and lie on your back with your arms stretched out to the sides. Make sure you have a pillow under your head and your legs are comfortable with your knees up.

There you have it! Try giving this a go for 2-4 minutes at the end of the day, or following practice/work/driving. Maybe even chuck one in your gig bag and have a stretch after sound check.

If you have more questions, or are in need of more detailed advice, head along to our bookings page or give us a call on 03 9973 2434.

- Rachel